Greene & Greene Robinson Dining Table Plans

The furniture for the Robinson House was the first furniture to be made in the Halls’ workshop, and represents the transition from the early Craftsman-influenced designs to the distinctive style of the Greene/Hall collaboration. There was also a great leap forward in the quality and attention to detail in the furniture. This table combines a base reminiscent of Japanese timber frame construction, and a top in the shape of a tsuba, a Japanese sword hilt-guard.

The Gamble House dining room table is similar in construction, and some of the details are more refined than in this example. In this table, the ebony pegs are round, and sit about 1/32 inch proud, while in the Gamble House table, square ebony pegs were used. The extension mechanisms are also similar, but the simple shapes of the tongues and grooves become sculptural curves in the later table.

Plans include detailed drawings printed on two 24″ X 36″ sheets.

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Comments

Greene & Greene Robinson Dining Table Plans — 4 Comments

  1. Just the Robinson House table. When I was researching for the book, I was able to get a much closer look at the Robinson Table.

  2. Built the Robinson House table, using your plans. Question: looking for a way hold the table-top “centered” on the base when leaves are installed. With the top expanded and two (of three possible) leaves are inserted, you can slide the entire table-top back-and-forth the width of the third leaf. Other than installing pins/holes to retain/center the one, or two leaf installation, I’m not seeing an obvious solution. Tell me I’m missing something obvious? Thank you!

    • Hi Chad,

      I think your solution of pins to hold the slides in the intermediate positions is a good solution. My plans were “all or nothing” for opening the top and adding leaves. Congratulations on the build.

      Bob

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